35008. Orient Line.

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35008. Orient Line.

Post by 34012 Launceston. on Wed Jun 10, 2009 7:59 am

Is Bob Deeth still at the MHR?


Last edited by 34012 Launceston. on Wed Sep 02, 2009 6:08 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: 35008. Orient Line.

Post by 35005CP on Wed Jun 10, 2009 9:13 pm

Yes Bob is still on the MHR.... He is expecting to retire very soon.

At the 40th Anniversary Steam Gala 35005 was renumbered 35008 and if you hadn't of guessed it - Bob was at the helm driving the loco for the day..

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Re: 35008. Orient Line.

Post by 34017 Ilfracombe on Fri Jun 12, 2009 5:45 pm

I think, those enthusiasts, that you mentioned 34012 Launceston, are likely to be members of this forum. So, I wait their reply; and it would be a good safe bet at the "bookies"

Some splendid tales of the 60s coming out now Very Happy

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Re: 35008. Orient Line.

Post by 35005CP on Sat Jun 13, 2009 6:56 am

34012 Launceston. wrote:With no contact from a gricer with a log, I will continue.........I need a date! October 1966 or March 1967. It was dark by 6pm.

When Bob and I boarded 35008 she showed about 150psi and 2/3 a boiler full of water. We were coupled to 10 coaches.

My first move was to fully open the Ajax firebox doors to reveal a blacked out fire! Next I removed the baffle plate to better see the brick arch and tubeplate. With a low fire it was fairly easy to view matters. The brick arch was sound. As for the tubeplate, it was covered in a light grey ash sediment, blocking 2/3rds of the visible tube openings. I drew out the long clinker shovel and began scraping it over the tube endings, removing some of the sediment, in the hope of clearing them. A bucket of sand was knicked from an adjacent 80000 standard tank and placed under the shoveling plate. With the clinker shovel stowed, I next drew the dart and thrust it into the fire, just under the door. Blower on full and all my 9 stone swinging, the dart made its progress through the unburnt coal. Beneath lay a clean bed of hot coals, a great sign. Once the dart had lifted all the fire, the baffle plate was replaced. Just 2 minutes to start time. At this stage I'd not even had time to look in the tender and see what sort of coal we had.

I then used the rake to pull the best of the unburt coal into the back corners, keeping the front fairly bright. A whistle, and we were away. 190psi and 2/3 a glass had to be enough. Bob gave her full regulator and up to 45% as we rounded Vauxhall and headed for Clapham. Presure down to 140psi and 1 Monitor injector cut fine. Not looking too rosy! With a coast through the Junction, she rallied to 180 and then Bob dug again. I asked him to give her the gun whilst I sprayed some of the sand at the tubeplate. As we passed Earlsfield the sparks flew when the sand hit the tubes. Had it worked? By now the fire was hot and I fed the corners, sides and under the door in the time honoured manner - little and often. Working the injectors I was maintaining 160/170 with half a glass and Bob had to nurse her along. The coal was of fairly good quality and my efforts were begining to pay off by Walton-On-Thames. The run to Woking was not the most memorial, as I needed to recover and Bob was still nursing her along to give me a chance.

Green lights at Woking meant it was do or die. I said to Bob, I've got two shovelfulls of sand left, so let her have it after the station. By now we were about 6 minutes down. In the cutting before St. Johns, Bob gave her full regulator and 55% whilst I removed the baffle plate and sprayed the last of our sand at the tubeplate. Wow, stair rods! Baffle plate back in, it was into the routine again - two left side, two right side, two left back, two right back. Close doors......Two left back, two right back, two under the door. Close doors......Watch needle.....Monitor injector cut fine, open a little.... another round...... That's the way it continued to Farnborough. By then we were around 195psi and half a glass. Between there and Basingstoke I began to feel that I was getting on top of Orient Line at last.

We passed Worting junction some 5 minutes down but now we were looking at a nice bright fire, 210psi and 3/4 a boiler of water. I was even able to turn up the train steam heat a bit! Exit was made from Litchfield tunnel in good order: 215psi and 2/3 full boiler. By now the speed was in the region of 78 mph and half regulator with 45% cut off. Bob asked how I felt about a turn of speed. Go for it I said, I'm game!

He pulled her into 25%, put the regulator in the roof and she began to chatter. Through Micheldever she was extended to 35% and the speed was reaching into the 90s. My job was to keep the water level up. By now I was using both injectors and monitoring the water level. The steam pressure was holding good at around 195psi and I was fireing in the normal manner, but now more often and not so little! The noise and vibration was unbelievable! The dust from around the boiler was growing, as all those little places gave a rattle. The tender coal spray was on, as was the ashpan wetter-cock. The pep-pipe was being sprayed around the footplate to keep the dust down. Bob calle me over tonsee the smiths spedometer at the 100mph mark!

Walers Ash tunnel loomed and we entered and exited in a flash. Then it was our job to spot Winchester Junction distant.

ON!!

Shiittte! Bob hit the brake as I tried to keep the dust down. We'd caught up the DEMU from the Alton line. Once the speed was reduced, we trundled into Winchester on restricted signals. I took the opportunity to clean things up. The coal and slurry had flooded the footplate under the braking forces. The ash and dust could be tasted and felt in the mouth and nostrills. We came to a stand at Winchester bang on time. That bloody DEMU was late!

As I was clearing up the mess and getting ready for the jog to Southampton, I became aware of Bob talking to people on the platform. This is what I recall hearing:

Gricer 1: "Hello driver, a very striking run, what speed did you reach"
Bob: (a man of few words!) "No more than 85mph" (the official limit with the vacuum brake trains then).
Gricer 2: "No, no, of course not. We made it 105mph, then lost track of the mileage posts!"
Gricer 1: " I made it 106mph, I'm very happy with that".
Gricer 2: "Can we have your name driver"?
Bob: "Death!"
Gricer 1: "Of Nine Elms"?
Bob: "No, Basingstoke"
Gricer 2: "Is that De'ath"?
Bob: "No! it's D-E-A-T-H! By name and nature"!
Gricer 3: "Gulp!"

We continued to Southampton at a somewhat sedate pace while I filled up the back corners of the 'box and got everything ship-shape for our relief. Stopping on the column, I was up and put the pipe in. The Bournemouth crew were surprised that we were on time and when they saw the loco, they couldn't believe it! She's a right mare, said the fireman. No, keep her "light and bright" and feed the sides and corners, and she'll get you home ok, I replied. Bob exchanged grunts with the driver!

A great run with a clapped-out loco, that's the only way to discribe it. Let's face it, she was run-down and in very poor shape. It goes to show that with good team work, the best can be squeezed from even the poorest machine.

The one thing that sticks in my mind about that trip with that loco and crew; what a fantastic achivement!
What could be done with a Bulleid Merchant Navy Pacific in top form and under perfect conditions?
A new World speed record?

Mallard? A beast in a time when all was in perfect order. A record never to be beaten. And the authorities didn't want to beat it.
I rest my case.

I hope you like the story.

Best wishes to Bob, with very fond memories.

It seems you know an awful lot about Bob Deeth? Or Deethy as we have come to call him! I've enjoyed reading your thread! It sounds like Bob in a Nutshell! It would be great if Bob Deeth was on this forum.... Maybe he could tell us a few stories of his own to get this forum really "Firing".... Very Happy

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Re: 35008. Orient Line.

Post by 35005CP on Wed Jun 17, 2009 2:48 am

I have his email address if you're interested? Thanks for the link - Do you know if these ebooks have pictures?

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Re: 35008. Orient Line.

Post by 35005CP on Wed Jun 17, 2009 8:57 pm

ebooks are electronic books. PM sent also.

Thanks

Andy

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Re: 35008. Orient Line.

Post by 35005CP on Fri Apr 01, 2011 7:18 am

One of our members (34012 Launceston) has gone quiet regarding this story on 35008 'Orient Line' A fabulous read it is too. Here it is;

With no contact from a gricer with a log, I will continue.........I need a date! October 1966 or March 1967. It was dark by 6pm.

When Bob and I boarded 35008 she showed about 150psi and 2/3 a boiler full of water. We were coupled to 10 coaches.

My first move was to fully open the Ajax firebox doors to reveal a blacked out fire! Next I removed the baffle plate to better see the brick arch and tubeplate. With a low fire it was fairly easy to view matters. The brick arch was sound. As for the tubeplate, it was covered in a light grey ash sediment, blocking 2/3rds of the visible tube openings. I drew out the long clinker shovel and began scraping it over the tube endings, removing some of the sediment, in the hope of clearing them. A bucket of sand was knicked from an adjacent 80000 standard tank and placed under the shoveling plate. With the clinker shovel stowed, I next drew the dart and thrust it into the fire, just under the door. Blower on full and all my 9 stone swinging, the dart made its progress through the unburnt coal. Beneath lay a clean bed of hot coals, a great sign. Once the dart had lifted all the fire, the baffle plate was replaced. Just 2 minutes to start time. At this stage I'd not even had time to look in the tender and see what sort of coal we had.

I then used the rake to pull the best of the unburt coal into the back corners, keeping the front fairly bright. A whistle, and we were away. 190psi and 2/3 a glass had to be enough. Bob gave her full regulator and up to 45% as we rounded Vauxhall and headed for Clapham. Presure down to 140psi and 1 Monitor injector cut fine. Not looking too rosy! With a coast through the Junction, she rallied to 180 and then Bob dug again. I asked him to give her the gun whilst I sprayed some of the sand at the tubeplate. As we passed Earlsfield the sparks flew when the sand hit the tubes. Had it worked? By now the fire was hot and I fed the corners, sides and under the door in the time honoured manner - little and often. Working the injectors I was maintaining 160/170 with half a glass and Bob had to nurse her along. The coal was of fairly good quality and my efforts were begining to pay off by Walton-On-Thames. The run to Woking was not the most memorial, as I needed to recover and Bob was still nursing her along to give me a chance.

Green lights at Woking meant it was do or die. I said to Bob, I've got two shovelfulls of sand left, so let her have it after the station. By now we were about 6 minutes down. In the cutting before St. Johns, Bob gave her full regulator and 55% whilst I removed the baffle plate and sprayed the last of our sand at the tubeplate. Wow, stair rods! Baffle plate back in, it was into the routine again - two left side, two right side, two left back, two right back. Close doors......Two left back, two right back, two under the door. Close doors......Watch needle.....Monitor injector cut fine, open a little.... another round...... That's the way it continued to Farnborough. By then we were around 195psi and half a glass. Between there and Basingstoke I began to feel that I was getting on top of Orient Line at last.

We passed Worting junction some 5 minutes down but now we were looking at a nice bright fire, 210psi and 3/4 a boiler of water. I was even able to turn up the train steam heat a bit! Exit was made from Litchfield tunnel in good order: 215psi and 2/3 full boiler. By now the speed was in the region of 78 mph and half regulator with 45% cut off. Bob asked how I felt about a turn of speed. Go for it I said, I'm game!

He pulled her into 25%, put the regulator in the roof and she began to chatter. Through Micheldever she was extended to 35% and the speed was reaching into the 90s. My job was to keep the water level up. By now I was using both injectors and monitoring the water level. The steam pressure was holding good at around 195psi and I was fireing in the normal manner, but now more often and not so little! The noise and vibration was unbelievable! The dust from around the boiler was growing, as all those little places gave a rattle. The tender coal spray was on, as was the ashpan wetter-cock. The pep-pipe was being sprayed around the footplate to keep the dust down. Bob calle me over tonsee the smiths spedometer at the 100mph mark!

Walers Ash tunnel loomed and we entered and exited in a flash. Then it was our job to spot Winchester Junction distant.

ON!!

Shiittte! Bob hit the brake as I tried to keep the dust down. We'd caught up the DEMU from the Alton line. Once the speed was reduced, we trundled into Winchester on restricted signals. I took the opportunity to clean things up. The coal and slurry had flooded the footplate under the braking forces. The ash and dust could be tasted and felt in the mouth and nostrills. We came to a stand at Winchester bang on time. That bloody DEMU was late!

As I was clearing up the mess and getting ready for the jog to Southampton, I became aware of Bob talking to people on the platform. This is what I recall hearing:

Gricer 1: "Hello driver, a very striking run, what speed did you reach"
Bob: (a man of few words!) "No more than 85mph" (the official limit with the vacuum brake trains then).
Gricer 2: "No, no, of course not. We made it 105mph, then lost track of the mileage posts!"
Gricer 1: " I made it 106mph, I'm very happy with that".
Gricer 2: "Can we have your name driver"?
Bob: "Death!"
Gricer 1: "Of Nine Elms"?
Bob: "No, Basingstoke"
Gricer 2: "Is that De'ath"?
Bob: "No! it's D-E-A-T-H! By name and nature"!
Gricer 3: "Gulp!"

We continued to Southampton at a somewhat sedate pace while I filled up the back corners of the 'box and got everything ship-shape for our relief. Stopping on the column, I was up and put the pipe in. The Bournemouth crew were surprised that we were on time and when they saw the loco, they couldn't believe it! She's a right mare, said the fireman. No, keep her "light and bright" and feed the sides and corners, and she'll get you home ok, I replied. Bob exchanged grunts with the driver!

A great run with a clapped-out loco, that's the only way to discribe it. Let's face it, she was run-down and in very poor shape. It goes to show that with good team work, the best can be squeezed from even the poorest machine.

The one thing that sticks in my mind about that trip with that loco and crew; what a fantastic achivement!
What could be done with a Bulleid Merchant Navy Pacific in top form and under perfect conditions?
A new World speed record?

Mallard? A beast in a time when all was in perfect order. A record never to be beaten. And the authorities didn't want to beat it.
I rest my case.

I hope you like the story.

Best wishes to Bob, with very fond memories.

_________________
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Posts : 1273
Join date : 2009-05-19
Age : 38
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